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Davutoglu retains Erdogan’s Cabinet

By   /   29/08/2014  /   Comments Off on Davutoglu retains Erdogan’s Cabinet

 

Changes in the cabinet were small and necessary

By Manolis Kostidis – Ankara

A few hours after receiving the mandate from President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to form a new government, Prime Minister of Turkey Ahmet Davutoglu announced the new cabinet.

No major changes have been done in the cabinet, since Davutoglu seems to have taken great care to maintain the economic team of the previous government so as to not cause concern.

The Turkish Prime Minister appointed Mevlut Cavusoglu as the new Foreign Minister, who in the previous government was Minister of EU. In the latter ministry was appointed Volkan Bozkir.

Ali Babacan the steady value

Ali Babacan remains as Deputy Prime Minister, responsible for the country’s economic policy. The same goes for Mehmet Simsek and Nihat Zeybekci, who will remain as Finance Minister and Economy Minister respectively. Many predicted the departure of Babacan, a desire he had expressed himself a few months ago. But the confidence he inspires on the international markets and investors forced the Turkish Prime Minister to keep him on the “wheel” of the turkish economy.

Taner Yildiz will continue as Minister of Energy for the new government.

The appointment of Yalcin Akdogan as Deputy Prime Minister is noteworthy. Akdogan until recently was the advisor of Recep Tayyip Erdogan and his presence in the Cabinet has its meaning.

Defense Minister Ismet Yilmaz and Interior Minister Efkan Ala will also continue at their posts.

Finally, Davutoglu will continue with the same Health Minister in the face of Mehmet Muezinoglou, who originates from Komotini, Greece.

Political analysts believe that Davutoglu tried to give the message that after the withdrawal of Erdogan from the party and the government nothing has changed and he will continue to follow the same policy with the persons selected by the President of the Republic of Turkey.

The new Foreign Minister of Turkey

Cavusoglu to follow the Davutoglu doctrine

The 46-year old Mevlut Cavusoglu until recently had not particularly stood out in the AKP. Many were not aware of his actions. His appointment in the Foreign Ministry was a surprise as the choice of the Head of the turkish Intelligence Hakan Fidan was considered a certainty.

Cavusoglu graduated from the Department of International Relations, Faculty of Political Sciences of the University of Ankara, with postgraduate studies at the American University of Long Island.

His was elected MP with the ruling AKP in the elections of 2002, 2007 and 2011. In 2010 he was elected President of the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, a position he held until 2012.

After the resignation of Egemen Bagis from the Ministry of EU, due to the financial scandals in December 25, 2013, he was appointed Minister responsible for the European Union. He is considered an expert on relations with the EU. He knows English, German and Japanese.

A few minutes after the announcement of his name for the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Cavusoglu prayed in the Kotzatepe mosque in Ankara and said: “I’ll be working night and day in order not to disappoint those who placed their trust in us and work for the foreign policy of our country”.

Those familiar with the relations between the Turkish Prime Minister and Cavusoglu say that there will be no change in the foreign policy after the appointment of the country’s new Foreign Minister, since he is expected to follow the “Davutoglu doctrine” that started in 2009.

Essentially there is a paradox going on in Turkey at the moment. Erdogan has chosen Davutoglu as Prime Minister to be the continuer of his policies and be able to exert absolute control over the government he handed to him, and Davutoglu gave the Foreign Ministry to Cavusoglu to be able to easily intervene, from his part, in the choices of the new minister.

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