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Erdogan Chief Advisor: Russian Ambassador murder could have been cause of War

By   /   01/01/2017  /   Comments Off on Erdogan Chief Advisor: Russian Ambassador murder could have been cause of War

Saadet Oruc, journalist and Chief Advisor to President of Turkey Recep Tayyip Erdogan spoke to IBNA about the Iran-Russia-Turkey alliance, Turkey – US relations, the Islamic State and Turkey’s role in the Syrian crisis. Oruc tells IBNA that if the murder of the Russian Ambassador to Turkey Andrey Karlov, had taken place “at a time when relations between the two countries were bad, then it could have been a cause of war”.

Read the full interview:

There are many questions surrounding the murder of the Russian Ambassador. How can the murder of Ambassador Karlov, affect Russian – Turkish relations?

I believe that it’s not not only this murder but also bombs, terrorist attacks in Ankara and Istanbul and the coup attempt, they are all related. We are living at a time when some terrorist organisations’ with local “contractors” that have international connections are targeting Turkey. And FETÖ participated in the coup attempt as well as in other terrorist attacks. It’s like having a group of terrorist organisations against Turkey. There’s a bomb every week, a strike every week. But the murder of the Russian ambassador has many dimensions; if it had occurred at a time when relations between the two countries were bad, then it could have been a cause of war! There is no other similar incident in the world i.e where a 22 year old police man, has taken leave from his service, has relations with FETO and had attended their schools. Do not forget that at the time of the murder FM Cavusoglu  was travelling to Moscow to talk about developments in Aleppo. This murder cannot be a work of a young person. He got his orders from somewhere. During the search of his home they found books and pamphlets affiliated with Al Nusra but these are efforts that are being made for disinformation.

Well since there were so many suspicions concerning his relationships with the organisation FETÖ how did he stay with the police when so many of his colleagues were dismissed on the same charges?

Essentially this justifies our suspicions, that there are still cells out there. While we are persecuting them they accuse us concerning our democratic values abroad etc. But there are cells. Even after the coup attempt the West is still not calling them terrorists.

There are media reports that state that Turkey is “drowning in the Syrian swamp”. Is terrorism in the country the result of a wrong policy in Syria? 

Did France or the US have a firm policy on Syria? Or the UN? Turkey hosted refugees. It is true that Turkey supported the opposition forces. But other countries have helped. There was confusion on whether Assad should stay or not. So we can not accuse Turkey for everything The intervention of Russia, Iran, the US elections many factors played a role. There is no explanation for terrorism and we should not dwell on this. Let’s not forget that some people want to change Turkey’s borders and want to corner it in. They blame us for not combating the Islamic State. Then when we go against the Islamic State they tell us to stay away from Mosul or somewhere else.

Is there a Iran-Russia-Turkey alliance? What’s going on with the US?

No. In places where there are obstacles in diplomatic efforts it is reasonable for certain countries to be looking for alternatives. There were the talks in Geneva,  now have another format. But the problem still exists. What has the US managed to do until now? Now there is another attempt. There on the other side of the ocean they are creating policies as if they are playing a video game. There are countries like Iran and Turkey that are actually living the Syria crisis. As is the presence of Russia. The US have to primarily take a look at their stance on the night of the coup attempt./IBNA

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